Twist on a Meme: My take on this life

April 27, 2012By 2 Comments

 

Just a short one today (I bet you’ll thank me for that!) I have been reading the meme a lot of D-Moms and D-Dads are sharing right now on the challenges of that role. It’s heartbreaking and beautiful. I decided to put my twist on it because I do think that while we all have our tough days, we simply must celebrate the amazing in this journey. So with all respect, credit and love to the original post, here’s my take:

Me, on the far right, with my very good friends, having a blast at OctoberFest at Attitash Mountain. See -- D Moms CAN have fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am the parent of a child with diabetes. I know what it’s like to see a child rise to the most challenging of occasions, and do it with grace. I know what it’s like to sleep at night and know for certain my child is going to face adversity with more charm, determination and cool that I could ever muster each day. I can name the carb count of every food on earth but I have no idea where I should be at 3 p.m. (And I know my daughter laughs at the girls who think they are carb counting). I know what its like to drop my daughter off at school after she’s battled a high or a low at night knowing that she’s strong enough to “suck it up” when other kids stay home for a sniffle. I know that sometimes with diabetes care, I make mistakes on dosage decisions and other things, but that I am just human, and so long as I’m doing well (and my daughter is doing well) most of the time, we are going to be fine. I know what its like for the pharmacist to know me so well that he fakes like he has to talk to me and cuts me to the front of the line whenever he can, and collects all the freebies from the vendors for me each month. I know what it’s like for my daughter to have to consider every morsel of food she eats (or realizes she should not eat), but also what it’s like to embrace what they taught us in the hospital when they had a frosted cookie party (omg!) Just let her live, and correct blood sugars later. It will be fine, and it always is. I am lucky enough to understand what is and isn’t a crisis in life (and I admit, I laugh inside at the parents who are ready to die over their kid not making first string in youth soccer. Seriously: this is not a crisis). I know what it’s like to watch your child suffer burnout from a relentless disease, and have it take years for that to turn around – but I also know the surge of love a mom feels when a child wins over that challenge. I know what it’s like to have spent 15 years working on helping her know that there is nothing she cannot do, even if it is with some extra work each and every hour, and no place she cannot go, even on her own, in this world. I know that thanks to new treatments funded by research we’ve raised money for, she will never be blind and most likely never need a kidney transplant (no more “Shelby situations” for us! Thank you, brilliant researchers). I know what it’s like to want to turn back time and just make all this go away. But I also know what it’s like to visit my daughter at her huge university and see her just marinated in joy. I know what it’s like to see her surrounded by great friends and a wonderful boyfriend. I know what it’s like to feel my heart hurt, but bounce back 100 times stronger. I hate diabetes and I, too, pray every day for a cure. But I know, too that the life of a mom of a child with diabetes is filled with pride, joy, power, and hope. I hate that diabetes picked my girl, but I love how she’s just winning over it. I know there are more challenges ahead, until the cure. But I know it will only make my child stronger until then.

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