Ride to Cure Training Update: The one with full moons, angels, and irrational pb and j cravings

August 9, 2012By 7 Comments

Every time I do a training loop for the JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes, I learn something new. Sometimes it’s funny; sometimes it’s awesomely random; sometimes it’s deep. The other day, I got a little bit of everything. Call this the potpourri of ride revelations post. Here goes:

*The tougher road makes the easier road, well, easier (I know. File that under “duh-oh,” but still). I’ve been riding pretty much 100 percent of the time around my town in the past month. That means potholes, weird sand patches, drains with grates that go the scary wrong way (riders know what I mean. Holy chance to crash hard, Batman), cars that often give me a wide berth but sometimes just seem annoyed I am there and all kind of other things that just make me ride, well, tighter. There is no question that when I’m worried or on alert or thinking ahead to what danger is next, it’s harder to ride. I tense up. I hold the handlebars tighter. And 25 miles feels like …. A loonnnggggg 25 miles. This week I was ready to do a 50 mile ride and decided to head back to the Cape to ride on a smooth, semi-safe, pretty riding trail. It was astounding how much more powerful I felt without all those obstacles in front of me. I pedaled harder but it felt smoother. I went longer but it felt shorter. It was, in a sense, a breeze (as much of a breeze as riding 50 miles in heat and humidity can be). Which made me think about diabetes. And life in general. I know there are times when all those obstacles rise up ahead of us and everything just seems to take forever to do and every other thing puts us on edge. It’s exhausting. But maybe the good of that exhaustion is the ability to feel how great it is when things go smoothly. For a moment as I cruised along I though, “Ahhh, is this what a ‘flat-line diabetes day’ feels like?” I wonder.

A smooth road for riding. If only all rides, life in general and dealing with diabetes could always be so sweet.

*Full Moons have a unique meaning sometimes (The part where I get all cosmic): So I’m cruising along at a pretty good clip, into the headwind that just seems to feel good this day, and I suddenly think to myself: “It’s like there’s an angel on my shoulder.” I know: cliché. But it really did. I wasn’t just moving well (well, moving well for me. I guess there’s a difference between that and many other riders ha ha), I felt like I was soaring. It was awesome. So then I thought, “Well, but come on: what angel would be with me today?” I could not really think of one. A boat passed me on the water, and as I always do (and as any coastal person knows to do), I waved. A group of teen boys waved back and then, a moment later: (wait for it and feel the cosmic-ness if you know the back story {and that was a pun}): they all flashed moons at me.

Okay, Michelle: Think of our conversation the night before. When you told me about how you planned to end your speech this November? I felt chills. (If Michelle agrees I’ll let her share if she thinks she knows who my angel was in the comments section). And at once I wondered: why me? I only met him in person the one time in 2003. I know, we spoke often of our children so it’s like I knew him well. But: why me? And how cool that a sign could also make you laugh yourself almost sick?

And why do my signs keep coming from in and around the ocean? Much to ponder.

*I wonder if this is what a low feels like? (The really pretty funny part): So thanks to a good friend and rider I’ve learned the magic of eating while you ride on long rides. My plan almost always involves a pb and j and some energy drink of some kind, split up as I ride. So this day I had a final half a pb and j, along with a coconut water (Hello, coconut water, my love. So glad you are in my life). I had another half split in half for different points of the ride. So the last half was waiting for me at my car. I can honestly tell you I was dying to get to that half sandwich and juice the last 15 miles of the ride. So as I coasted to my car, it was all that was on my mind. I got my key and phone out of my little bike pouch, clicked the hatch of my SUV open, put the keys and phone down on the inside, tossed my bike in, grabbed my phone and slammed the SUV hatch shut.

What’s missing in that story? Yeah. The keys. Sitting inside and the car is now locked. This is my new car, and I don’t even know where at home (which is a few towns away) the spare is. I call Triple A and wait…. Thinking a little about my sandwich and juice but being patient and happy I’m at least at the ocean. They come, but alas, the guy cannot open my car (apparently high end vehicles are designed to not be stolen. Imagine!) So I call my husband who is at work about an hour away and ask him to go home, get the spare and drive down. I sit on the grass and stare at the car. I’m weirdly hungry. And then a thought comes to me.

And I think this in what I believe to be a rational way:

If I broke the window, I could get the sandwich and coconut juice out to eat while I waited. And insurance covers broken windshields 100 percent. Hmmmmm…..

 Oh, come on, I thought. You’re not that hungry. And yet. I bet there’s a decent rock down on the shore. I could smash it pretty easily.

And then: Sandwich. Sandwich. Juice. Sandwich. So good. Need it.

 Okay so I did not act on my desire, but I really felt it. And once my husband came and clicked the door open (shortly before we learned that with out car, the company can open it remotely. DUH OH!) I scarfed down that soggy, hot pb and j like it was filet mignon.

Does this look windshield-smash-worthy to you?

I need to point this out: not once did I think this: I could smash the window and get the keys. The sandwich and juice was all I cared for in life.

I don’t know what a low feels like but as I laughed later I had to wonder: I had no shakes or freaky stuff but the mental thing. Pretty funny and strange.

So that’s all for this ride lesson. Up next week: three rides. What will I see and learn? It’s kind of fun to wonder.

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Comments (7)

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  1. Kerri. says:

    Soggy PB&J sandwiches are terribly similar to filet. Especially while low. :)

  2. Jessica Bearak says:

    I have become quite an expert at making PB&J sandwiches at Ride rest stops. Too bad I won’t be in DV. I would make an extra special sandwich for you!

  3. Dawn Ripley says:

    Just a thought… I’m not sure if you believe in astrology… but when is your birthday??? If you are a water sign ( Like me I’m a cancerian) it would make alot of sense as to why you get most of your signs from in or around the water!!!

    BTW you are amazing!! I cant imagine riding a mile let alone 50 miles just for fun, but I have had the opportunity recently to meet up with a guy who rides for the tour de cure and happens to be my physical therapist and a triathlete. I give you all all the kudos I can muster. You are an inspiration for those of us that cant do the stuff you do.

    • Moira says:

      Thank you Dawn. I doubt myself sometimes so your words mean a lot. And of course you know: I ride for you. And I hope you are recovering well!

  4. Michelle Page Alswager says:

    Signs are everywhere when you just pay attention to them and I have no doubt that my Jesse was cheering you on in only the way he knew best.

  5. Wrong way grates sound like one of the most terrifying things ever!

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